Annual Report

A few weeks ago, we took Kaitlyn for the second part of her annual evaluation with the psychologist.  This was the one-on-one session where he basically interviews her and gets a good idea of how she has progressed or changed since our last visit.  Overall, the visit was about 90 minutes long.

Last week, we received the clinical report (and when I say “clinical,” I mean it very literally.  As usual, the report was filled with “doctor speak,” which we have had translated for us in the past, so we are familiar with it now.).

There were no real surprises in the report at all, and it read pretty much like last year’s did.  Really, the only “change” that was noted was that, according to the DSM-5, Kaitlyn now technically has Level 1 Autism Spectrum Disorder.  After researching what exactly that means (she will “require support”), I concluded that it is just a fancy way of saying she has Asperger’s (because it will be so much easier to tell people, “my daughter has Level 1 Autism Spectrum Disorder” than it was to say, “she has Asperger’s.”  Now, in addition to explaining what her diagnosis means, Amber and I will first have to overcome the blank looks from people trying to comprehend what we meant by “Level 1.”).  Here is what Level 1 is:

Social Communication:  Without supports in place, deficits in social communication cause noticeable impairments. Difficulty initiating social interactions, and clear examples of atypical or unsuccessful response to social overtures of others. May appear to have decreased interest in social interactions. For example, a person who is able to speak in full sentences and engages in communication but whose to- and-fro conversation with others fails, and whose attempts to make friends are odd and typically unsuccessful.

Restricted, repetitive behaviors:Inflexibility of behavior causes significant interference with functioning in one or more contexts. Difficulty switching between activities. Problems of organization and planning hamper independence.

Basically, Level 1 Autism Spectrum Disorder mirrors Asperger’s.

The report did mention that Kaityln probably also has Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), which made Amber immediately point out (rightfully) that she inherited that from me.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: